I Tried A DNA Testing Kit: Here’s What I Learned

I was one of many who took advantage of DNA ancestry kits going on sale over the holidays. I purchased Ancestry DNA through Amazon for about $60 in December. Per Amazon Prime shipping, I received the kit two days later.

Collecting Your Sample

Included inside was instructions for collecting the sample and sending it in with a box with prepaid postage to send the sample in. The sample is deposited in a tube filled with a stabilizing fluid. You fill the top of the container with your spit (you have to wait thirty minutes after eating or drinking anything which was surprisingly challenging) and then seal it and break the barrier to allow the stabilizing fluid to mix with your spit.
The kit had to be activated before sending on the Ancestry website as well.

Waiting

Once the kit was mailed, you could track the progress of your sample through the Ancestry.com website. From arrival to processing to complete, your spit’s journey is projected in a little progress bar.
I mailed in my sample around December 22nd and received an email that my sample had arrived at their labs on January 4th. The website stated that the waiting period from arrival to the beginning of processing could take anywhere from 6-8 weeks due to high demand, but I ended up receiving my results on January 30th. About three and a half weeks from arrival which was a much faster turn around time than I had anticipated.

The Results

The result was delivered in a linked email which leads to the Ancestry website and is found under the DNA tab.

Home

 

AncestryHome
DNA Matches and DNA Circle redacted to protect identities.

From the homepage, you will find access to you ethnicity breakdown with the majority ethnicities showing from the home widget. You will also find added features unique to Ancestry.com which matches you with suggested relatives who have completed their own DNA samples and DNA circles that have already been mapped to shared ancestors.
The DNA Matches for me have been accurate thus far as I was matched with at least two known relatives, for example, Ancestry was able to accurately discern a first cousin as a first cousin. Which is cool. I had minimal contact with my biological father and his family, so I am very interested in connecting with more people from his side.
Consequently, not knowing my father’s family (he was adopted) led me to take the test in the first place. My mother’s side has a pretty detailed genealogy completed by my grandfather and uncle, so I was confident in the information I had on their pedigree.

Ethnicity Region Breakdown

 

AncestrySharing
Ancestry provides three cards for easy sharing on social media.

You can share your results on your social media or by email with these predesigned cards which gives you three different options for displaying your ethnic breakdown. I chose to share the middle card.
I am a very white, freckled, coppery haired girl, so the high confidence ethnicity regions did not surprise me. My brother had done some digging on my father’s relatives in the past and had traced our birth surname to a Scandinavian name so seeing that reflected in a high percentage was very interesting and reaffirmed the information he had uncovered. Sidenote: since discovering our Viking heritage my brother has grown a pretty impressive red beard.
The low confidence regions however really interested me. I think it reveals a pretty complicated history of my ancestors’ immigration. I know some history which can explain the more southern regions. There was a time in history when Germanic tribes (Visigoths and Goths) settled all over Europe including southern areas which may explain the percentage of my DNA from those areas (the Iberian Peninsula and Italy/Greece).
I was also surprised by the 1% European Jewish. This may come in through several branches of the family tree. Jewish people have experienced many periods of migration, facing frequent discrimination and expulsion from various regions. Ancestry provides a brief history of each ethnicity region and explains that the Jews who settling in Germany were called the Ashkenazi Jews and spoke Yiddish. This is likely where my percentage descended.
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Ancestry provides an interactive map where you can break down each ethnicity region, including the countries that comprise the region and an overview and link to more history of the region and the people who lived there.

Migrations

Besides showing the ethnicity regions that reflect in your DNA, Ancestry provides insight into significant migrations relative to your DNA results. I had a couple of substantial migratory periods in my ancestry, including the movement of the Scots-Irish to the Appalachia region and then the Appalachians into the Ohio/Indiana/Michigan region post-WWII.
 

AncestryMigrations
Many Scots-Irish settled in Appalachia during this period and, due to the isolated nature of the region, the community still retains many of the linguistic, religious, and familial tendencies of their ancestors. This is where I still live today.

Pros and Cons of Ancestry DNA

Pros

Ancestry.com is a trusted genealogy website. They are good at what they do and provide the appropriate tools to really get the most out of your results.
Many public libraries have subscriptions to Ancestry.com meaning you can access the advanced features for free! The community college library I work at has a subscription as well, and many other colleges in our area are trialing the site as well.
You can connect with living family members.
Cost is low compared to other DNA Testing Kits.

Cons

Ancestry.com costs money to access advanced features (searching vital records, connecting with completed family trees that you are matched with, etc.) if you don’t have access to a subscription already.
Other DNA testing kits such as 23andMe provide the option to test for genetic health risks and whether you are a carrier, though this is an upcharge. 23andMe also can check to see what percentage of Neanderthal DNA you have retained. Which is…something?

Is Ancestry DNA Worth the Cost?

This is very subjective. I feel like these DNA testing kits appeal to a particular population, those who have been adopted or whose immediate relatives were adopted or who have lost track of their genealogy. And care about their lineage. Coming from Appalachia, many people here are very preoccupied with their family trees. During elections, it is not uncommon for candidates to list their parents and even grandparents in their ads.
I am both interested in my family tree because of the regional preoccupation and because my father was adopted. For me, the test was more than worth the cost just for the ability to connect with living relatives and more efficiently build my family tree on my dad’s side. I also have access to the Ancestry subscription through my institution and can dig deeper than the DNA service allows for nonsubscribers.
If you don’t have any weird deviations in your family trees like adoption and your family has had access to well-kept birth, marriage, and death records this service is probably not for you. It won’t reveal anything you don’t already know. However, the kits which test genetic disorders might be a more cost-effective method for those wishing to conceive who also want to test to see if they are a carrier for any kind of genetic disease.
I am pleased with my results, and with the service, I have received thus far from Ancestry DNA and Ancestry.com.
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