A Court of Wings and Ruin: Book Review

A Court of Wings and Ruin Book Cover and Link to Amazon Affiliate PageA Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas

I don’t know where to begin with this review. Sarah J. Maas is everything I aspire to be as a writer. I fell in love with this series when the first book was released in 2015. A Court of Wings and Ruin is an excellent culmination of all the emotions and switchbacks this series has thrust upon me. Not to say the 3rd book wraps up all the storylines neatly, it does not (hence Book #4 or 3.1 according to Goodreads, A Court of Frost and Starlight which I hope will address the fates of a few more of our beloved characters).

Also, the film rights to this book series have been purchased so look for this already incredibly popular series to explode on the mainstream very soon.

A Court of Wings and Ruin Review (And Much Spoiling)

I read Book #2, A Court of Mist and Fury when it was first released in 2016, so there were a couple of years between the last time I entered the Court of Thorns and Roses world. A Court of Wings and Ruin picks up where A Court of Mist and Fury ended. Feyre is spirited back to the Spring Court. Tamlin believes she has been bewitched by Rhysand, that she still loves him, and that he can heal what he considers to be broken within her.

However, unbeknownst to him, Feyre is tricking him and his Court. She bides her time, hides her power, waiting to unleash her revenge for ripping her away from what we know to be her mate. And for betraying her sisters to Hybern.

Feyre revenge is succinct and timely, but Lucien becomes entangled just as she unleashes it. Forced to take him along, they flee through the courts, their magic dampened by faebane. They sneak through Lucien’s own home, the Autumn Court and by his murderous family. They must travel on foot until they can reach a place where their magic is restored enough to winnow home.

This part is full of harrowing near misses, including their discovery by Lucien’s older brothers including Eris, who we know to be the Morrigan’s former betrothed.

After a battle on the ice in the Winter Court, Cassian and Azriel swoop in to save the day as per their usual. Feyre’s power as High Lady and her status as a Made creation of the High Lords in which she absorbed their gifts is revealed.

Home At Last

Feyre and Rhys’ reunion is as satisfying as we all hoped it would be, full of lovemaking and tenderness. This part reaffirms their mating bond. They belong together, and this scene leaves no doubt. Especially in such stark contrast to the violence Feyre experiences at Tamlin’s court from the disgruntled High Lord of Spring.

Her reunion with her friends is as satisfying. We are reintroduced to Mor and Amren, and the group’s dynamic is as entertaining as always. New to the Court of Dreams brood are newly Made Nesta and Elain, and the journey roughened Lucien who Cassian and Azriel also rescued.

Though Nesta’s spirit remains unwaveringly defiant, Elain suffers as a Fae. Though her bond with Lucien was revealed in ACOMAF, she still loves her human fiance. The book’s treatment of Elain is the only thing that borders on slightly tedious. The author does give us a few thrilling moments with this character that makes the set up worth the wait.

A Sleeping Evil Awakened

The majority of the book focuses on their plans to stop Hybern from destroying the wall that divides Fae from humans. The High Lords make another appearance after the Summer Court is attacked by Hybern’s forces, his intent towards their destruction becoming evident.

Unfortunately, that means convening the High Lords of Autumn and Spring as well. Beron, Lucien’s sociopathic father, and Tamlin are the most reluctant High Lords to join an alliance against Hybern. Beron, out of self-interest and spite. Tamlin, for more obvious reasons. His armies are still unrecovered from Feyre’s sabotage.

The alliance discussions go as well as you’d expect from so many strong personalities. Throughout we glimpse more of Nesta’s power. She is connected to the Cauldron, having taken some of its power when she was Made. During the discussions, the Wall is destroyed by Hybern, and the alliance is tenuously agreed upon by the majority of the High Lords. Tamlin is non-responsive. Unbeknownst to Beron, Eris has made a deal with Rhys, Feyre, and Keir of the Court of Nightmares to ensure Beron’s compliance in exchange for their assistance in overthrowing his father to take his throne.

We are also handed some delightful sexual tension between Cassian and Nesta, who stubbornly refuses to acknowledge his interest for most of the book. Of course, that makes me ship them even harder.

At this point, Lucien has departed for the continent in an attempt to find the human queen, Vassa, who is cursed but commands a large army to try to gain her support in the war. Elain still mourns the loss of her fiance and the life she envisioned with him as humans.

The Wars Waged

A Court of Wings and Ruin continues with Rhys, Feyre, Cassian, Azriel, Mor, and Amren trying to find a way to defeat Hybern. In addition to pledging the support of the other HIgh Lords and their armies, they want to use Nesta’s power to wield the Cauldron against Hybern.

Nesta’s training and lessons from Amren on the Cauldron are tedious and not promising as Hybern continually moves forward, attacking and confusing the High Lords’ forces. The battles are bloody and detailed. Maas, who I am assuming has never been on a battlefield, describes them very well. What she captures even better is the fear in Feyre as she awaits the end, feeling for Rhys to make sure he is alive. As a military spouse, I appreciated that particular recognition of potential loss with each battle.

The final battle begins in the human realm at the coast. Hybern’s forces are enormous, and the High Lords are outnumbered. Even with Feyre and Rhys’ recruitment of the Others, the Weaver, the Bone Carver, and Bryaxis, they lose ground. Hybern pushes into them, and for a very long time, they seem poised to lose it all.

That Ending Though

At the final (nearly) moment, the fabled Drakon and Miryam arrive with their army of Seraphim. Also in tow, Queen Vassa’s human army. Elain’s former fiance, Beron, and Tamlin arrived with their armies earlier to aid the Court of Dreams. Even then they seem outmatched.

As I mentioned before, Elain’s general damsel-in-distress act was wearing a little thin, but she more than makes up for that in the end. Hybern locates Nesta who tries to use the Cauldron’s power as a distraction to draw him away. It works, a little too well.

While Feyre and Amren try to disable Hybern’s hold on the Cauldron’s power, Nesta battles the man himself. But Hybern has their father, the human who led an armada of others, to fight against him. She has little control and quickly loses ground, especially when Hybern breaks their father’s neck, killing him instantly. She finally throws herself atop Cassian in the last resort to either save them both or die together (again, shipping so hard).

At the moment before their death Elain comes alive and strikes the first, debilitating blow against King Hybern, taking him down. Nesta finishes the job, delivering the killing strike that she promised him after being Made.

That still isn’t the end though.

*Deep breath*

RHYS IS DEAD?!

Feyre, our main heroine, is the one who has to end this story. Amren had tricked her into grasping the Cauldron alone. She wants her to release her from the Fae body to which she had been bound. In order to save everyone. Feyre does and Amren makes a neat job of wiping Hybern’s now autonomous forces off the battlefield.

The act of releasing her destroys the Cauldron, splitting it into three pieces and leaving its power uncontained. The Cauldron is poised to consume the world they’d just saved.

Rhys arrives and together, they use their power to remake the Cauldron. But Rhys, already drained from fighting, dies from the effort.

So, at this point, I am sobbing. Feyre is sobbing. I am thinking of how cruel Maas is to make us fall in love with Rhys so much, to reunite Feyre with him only to rip him away. But lucky for us, especially me, this author seems to be a sucker for happy endings.

In the same way Feyre was revived and Made, the High Lords give a piece of their power to bring Rhys back. Tamlin is the final one, in his act of redemption. I can, almost, forgive him for everything to this point. Rhys stutters back to life, dragging Amren back with him. Though she is now pure Fae with no Other, she is still the same salty Amren we know and love.

Final Thoughts

I love this series and the world Maas created. My hope is that she returns to it beyond A Court of Frost and Starlight. I would like to read a prequel about Juriel, Drakon, and Miryam’s origins.

The writing was on point as always, though I’ve seen other reviews that criticized the writing as rushed and in need of further editing. I did not notice that. The book was polished, well-structured, and the characters felt genuine to previous books. I felt like this was an excellent ending to the main storyline, to Hybern’s reign of terror, Feyre’s rift with her siblings and father. The whole love triangle that was actually a love line with a dot outside was wrapped up nicely as well. Tamlin found some redemption and Feyre was able to release any guilt she may have had about leaving him for Rhysand.

5/5 Stars

Check out my other book reviews!

Heartless by Marissa Meyer

The Fiery Cross by Diana Gabaldon

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