Daisy Jones & The Six: Book Review

Daisy Jones & The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Daisy Jones & The Six Book Cover

Daisy Jones & The Six: Not All About the Music

I should preface this review by saying that I am not a huge fan of 70’s rock. I don’t hate it or avoid it, I am just very lazy when it comes to finding music. While I can appreciate the classics, I am usually content listening to Top 40 hits on the radio. Daisy Jones & The Six (check out the Goodreads synopsis) does not require its readers to love 70’s rock or rock music in general.

This book is about more than rock and roll. (Rock n’ roll?) This is a story about faith, faith in others and faith in ourselves. It is a love triangle but not the obnoxious kind. There are no clear answers and regardless of your personal opinion on Billy Dunne’s choice at the end, nobody leaves totally satisfied. The heartbreak bleeds through to the end, happy ending or no.

Story Format

The book is written as an oral history. Instead of paragraphs or chapters in one POV, each character is speaking to a narrator who is interviewing them. The identity of the narrator revealed until the end was somewhat surprising. I did not see it coming. The author’s choice to write the story as oral history interviews makes sense once the narrator’s identity is revealed. It adds a layer to the story that a traditional past tense 3rd person POV or 1st person POV would not have provided.

The Dunnes

When I picked this book up I had no idea the story would include themes of family or parental sacrifices. When we meet Billy Dunne, he seems like the quintessential rocker, ambitious, dedicated to the sound, shaggy and into drugs. The author throws Camila into his life and she changes the story’s trajectory. Camila is Billy’s serious girlfriend pre-breakout and he marries her once he signs a record contract. Billy is not a family man, he is a man who marries a family woman.

Camila is not a hero. She is a fighter. She is a settler. Camila loves her children more than herself and more than her husband. When he cheats on her and reveals his drug addiction, she refuses to leave him or let him leave her. Again, this is not heroic, but I respected Camila’s tenacity and her continued faith in Billy. Far more women are right to leave their spouses who act in this way, especially when children are involved.

“I think you have to have faith in people before they earn it. Otherwise it’s not faith, right?” Camila says of her commitment to Billy and that defines her place in this story.

Daisy Jones

This is not a book solely about the relationship between Billy and Camila or his addiction and struggle to remain clean.

Daisy Jones is a headstrong, overly talented, under ambitious teen when we meet her. Gorgeous and born into privilege, Daisy has never had to work hard for things she wanted, except her parents’ genuine attention and affection. She is invisible to them unless they need a prop to get ahead professionally. Daisy benefits from a series of opportunities that leads her to meet The Six, including lead singer Billy Dunne.

Daisy, addicted to drugs from a young age, shares the same addiction problems as Billy. This is one of the things they bond over, eventually.

Billy and Daisy’s relationship is complicated. There is attraction, chemistry, in the beginning. Billy’s resistance to their chemistry makes him angry. He keeps his distance as long as possible, knowing inevitably they would end up in a position where that sexual attraction would overpower their professional relationship.

It does and we get a heartbreakingly close yet so far kiss scene when Billy and Daisy finally come together to write the album for a collaboration arranged by their record label. The narrator touts the album as one that would change rock and roll forever.

The Six

The rest of The Six are not satellite characters. They are integral to the story, the band’s success, and the band’s ultimate downfall.

Graham Dunne is Billy’s devout younger brother and band co-founder. He falls head over heels for the band’s keyboardist.

Karen, the keyboardist, remains steadfastly independent throughout the story.

Eddie and Pete are brothers. Eddie is a guitarist, constantly feeling he is competing with Billy Dunne but never admitting there is no competition. Pete is the drummer with no real devotion to the band and a girlfriend back home he stays faithful too.

Warren is the band’s carefree comedic relief, there for the music and the drugs and never taking himself seriously.

The Rise

The Six sign to a record label and release an album prior to teaming up with Daisy Jones. They experience success, largely thanks to Billy’s on-stage charisma and devotion to songwriting.

Teddy, The Six’s manager and Billy’s mentor/father figure, hooks them up with Daisy Jones who released a smaller album of covers prior. Even he could not have foreseen the meteoric rise of The Six with Billy and Daisy’s chemistry.

Billy and Daisy record a single for The Six’s second album and tour with Daisy as their opening act. The tour is a particular struggle for Billy, freshly clean and Camila is pregnant with twins and with a toddler in tow.

Daisy staunchly continues on her path to destruction, drugged out and dating a shady agent who keeps her too doped up to realize she is unhappy with him. But Billy and Daisy on stage when they sing their single is magic.

Those moments where they are together singing cements Daisy’s involvement in the next album and the band’s new name, Daisy Jones & The Six.

The Fall

Despite fame, expanded tour dates, rocketing album sales, and merchandise, Billy and Daisy’s raw attraction causes discord off-stage. They come close to an affair while writing The Six’s third album but Billy pulls away. Daisy realizes she can’t have Billy and Billy realizes he wishes he could have Daisy.

He goes home to his wife and children and the love triangle collapses.

Throughout the relationship drama, the band members feel auxiliary to the band’s success. Billy blows Graham off when he approaches him with an emergency. Graham reevaluates his relationship with his brother and his commitment to the band. Pete confides in Eddie that he is leaving after the third album’s tour to marry his girlfriend and settle down.

Daisy’s drug addiction is the final nail in the coffin for Daisy Jones & The Six. Daisy must look at herself honestly after eloping with an Italian prince she barely knows.

Camila disillusions Daisy of any final hope she may have had of Billy returning her affections.

The album goes platinum and the band breaks up.

Final Thoughts

This was the first genuinely enjoyable book I have read in awhile. A book that is just fun AND good. It wasn’t life-changing. The insights weren’t original necessarily, and the characters won’t be enshrined somewhere for all time. Daisy Jones & The Six is a quick read and enjoyable. Sometimes, that’s all we need from fiction.

My Rating

4/5 Stars

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Reading Goals 2019: Microhistories & Writing Reference

2018

My 2018 Goodreads Reading Goal was set at 20 books. I have to this point read 23 books and I am *hoping* to read another 2 before the ball drops on January 1st.

What about 2019?

I have started to think about what I want to set my reading goal for 2019. As a working mother, reading can be a super difficult thing to carve out time for. I found myself sneaking in pages during bath time, after bedtimes, and during breaks at work. That equaled about 23-25 books for me in 2018.

Granted, I did not prioritize reading over certain other areas of my life, like Netflix binging and social media which can seriously eat up huge amounts of your free time without realizing.

My greatest obstacle ended up not being a mother of a toddler or a full-time academic librarian, but rather a general disregard and disrespect for reading over non-soul fulfilling activities.

With all that in mind, I am hoping to increase my reading goal for 2019 from 20 books to 30 books coupled with a New Year’s Resolution to watch less TV and spend less time on social media and my smartphone.

What’s in my TBR pile?

My specific reading goals include reading more microhistories which are non-fiction books which focus on a very specific historical topic like Salt: A World History.

This is in connection with my writing goals for 2019, which include completing all drafts of my WIP, Changeling, which I have written about and shared pieces of frequently here in the past, get through the second draft of another WIP, Foxface, which was my 2018 National Novel Writing Month project, and write the first draft of at least two more story ideas I have been incubating the past year, an adult literary fiction novel titled The Gospel of Eve and a YA Fantasy tentatively titled Daring based on the myth of Virginia Dare and the Lost Colony of Roanoke.

I also want to read more writing reference type books, obviously to compliment my writing goals. I have many in my TBR pile I have stocked up on over the last year so I really want to get through all of those.

My Owned TBR Writing References:

Revision & Self-Editing by James Scott Bell

Time to Write by Kelly L. Stone

The Essential Guide to Getting Your Book Published by Arielle Eckstut and David Henry Sterry

Writing & Selling the YA Novel by K.L. Going

Paper Hearts by Beth Revis

That list will undoubtedly grow as I buy/check out other writing references through the year. My favorite writing reference author is James Scott Bell and I have read at least two of his other references in the past year, he has many more, which I will probably add to this list soon.

Setting goals and getting ish done!

I think, and this is certainly not an independent thought, that setting goals and intentions is the best way to ensure you achieve those goals. These are concrete titles, numbers, and deadlines. There is accountability in that and that is so important for adult-type learners (Hello, twenty-nine, I see you creeping up on me).

Question-time!

What are your reading/writing goals for 2019?

Do you prefer to set goals/resolutions each year or do you set non-traditional time frames (two years, six months)? Do you set time-frames at all?

Extras

"Why try to cheat the Gods out of a game I am prepared to win?" An excerpt from Foxface on abookishmama.com
The last line of my 2018 NaNoWriMo project!

Top 5 Favorite Literary Heroines

What makes female characters literary heroines? For me, these are females who instilled in me a sense of power in my gender. These women, most of whom are positioned in times of absolute masculine authority, defy conventions. They set out to achieve their heart’s desires in spite of everything thrown at them.

I can’t remember when I learned to read, but I know it was very early. I have been enamored with reading my entire conscious life. My favorite books feature strong female main characters. So, narrowing down my top five favorite literary heroines was a challenge. I could switch these out so many others like Anne Shirley, Feyre Archeron, Elizabeth Bennett, Offred, Annabeth Chase, I could go on and on…

The List of Literary Heroines

But here, in no particular order exactly, are my top five favorite literary heroines. Also included are the books they are featured in and the writers who gave them life (dominant females in their own right).

Jo March from Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

Little Women Book Cover Literary Heroines with link to Amazon page

Jo March was my childhood hero. She was independent, stubborn, but loveable, and a writer. In fact, it was my introduction to Jo March that inspired me to want to be a professional author and to start writing my own stories. I loved the way she dreamed and then pursued her dreams, rejecting the social constructs of her time. Little Women was a book I reread over ten times throughout my life. I bought multiple editions of it, though my favorite is an old copy my aunt gave me before she passed away.

Laura Ingalls Wilder from Little House on the Prarie Series by Laura Ingalls Wilder

Little House in the Big Woods book cover with link to Amazon pageLaura Ingalls Wilder tells the story of her childhood growing up on a homestead. She tells stories of traveling west, meeting colorful characters, meeting her husband, and eventually becoming a teacher and starting a family. Of course, Wilder took some artistic license with her memories for entertainment value but her heroine, Laura Ingalls, still makes the list. She was mouthy and adventurous though she eventually settled down as was expected of a woman of her time. The impressive part of her story is the transition of her portrayal in her semi-biographical books to her real-life role as a famous, beloved children’s author. I can remember doing all of my book reports in elementary school over her, and it was a series I reread many times.

Hermoine Granger from Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone book cover and link to Amazon pageI don’t think anyone my age or younger wouldn’t have Hermoine Granger on their list of favorite literary heroines. There are many reasons for that, the first being that Hermoine is not the main character of the series, but she is smarter and more talented than the main character. Right to the end. The Brightest Witch of Our Time. Hermoine’s friendship with Harry Potter and Ron Weasley starts off rocky. They do not take to her as quickly as they do to each other, treating her like an annoyance. But Hermoine proves to be an invaluable resource, as a friend, schoolmate, partner-in-crime, and finally a spouse. Hermoine owns her power, doesn’t try to dumb herself down or dim her shine and I think that was so needed for girls, in the 90s and today.

Claire Fraiser from Outlander Series by Diana Gabaldon

Outlander Book Cover with link to Amazon pageClaire Fraiser is a recent favorite of mine. I started listening to the Outlander series on audiobook a little over a year ago. Claire is a former WWII nurse, so right off the bat we know she has been through something incredible. But the story opens at the close of the War, Claire and her husband are attempting a second honeymoon. They are trying to reconnect after eight years apart; he was a soldier. She is ripped from her world and thrown in 18th-century Scotland where she meets and is subsequently married to Jamie Fraiser. Claire falls in love with him, and when an opportunity presents itself to return to her own time, she stays. She wholly owns herself and is confident in her intelligence and sensuality.

Jane Eyre from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë

Jane Eyre Book Cover with link to Amazon page to buy bookDespite the latest terrible movie adaptation of one of my favorite novels of all time, Jane Eyre is a complicated woman to keep down. An orphan for much of her life, she had to learn quickly that to survive she had to take matters into her own hands. That is what she does when she travels to Thornfield Hall and encounters the mysterious and intimidating Mr. Rochester. She then proceeds to marry him (with some stuff in between). Again, here is a woman born in a time when they were more likely to be sold off in marriage. Jane Eyre overcomes her environment, her position as a poor orphan and a governess, and achieves her heart’s desire.

Check out my other book related posts!

The Fiery Cross: Book Review

Heartless: Book Review

TBR Additions: April

TBR Additions: March

I feel like I have very little time in my day for recreational reading but as my previous post stated, self-care is essential. Reading is one of my favorite forms of accomplishing self-care. So, I want to not only read more day to day but also expand my TBR pile and give myself the incentive to read those TBR titles.
What better way than public pressure and shame?
J/K, I am not looking to take away the enjoyment I get from reading when I am able to do so or put pressure on myself with more deadlines, but I thought I might share the titles that pique my interest enough for me to pursue the time to read them.
Here are my March additions to my TBR. All tags are from Goodreads.

Tags: fantasy, young adult, fiction

Tags: nonfiction, biography, biography-memoir, mystery>crime, European literature>British literature, mystery, adult, biography>autobiography

Tags: young adult, science fiction, science fiction>dystopia, romance, space, fiction, young adult>teen, young adult>young adult science fiction, fantasy, science fiction fantasy

Tags: young adult, magical realism, contemporary, fiction

Tags: fantasy, young adult, mythology>mermaids, retellings, fantasy>mythology, romance, young adult>young adult fantasy, adventure>pirates, fantasy>fairy tales, fiction

Tags: fiction, cultural>india, literary fiction, contemporary, adult, feminism, cultural, adult fiction, novels, literature>Asian literature

Tags, fiction, contemporary, literary fiction

Tags: fiction, fantasy, contemporary

What are your March TBR additions? Give me your book recs in the comments!
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